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mirror grinding machine plans

Mirror Grinding Machine

My Mirror Grinding Machine. For a long time I've wanted to build a machine for grinding telescope mirrors. Dennis Rech's M-o-M designs finally inspired me to just get up and do it. Over the years, I'd been collecting motors, gear boxes, pulleys, etc. Most of them came from industrial junk yards.

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How I built an edge grinder for telescope mirror blanks.

I borrowed a few ideas from the Mirror-O-Matic mirror grinding machine, particularly how to mount the turntable on top of the pulley. Anyone building machinery for cold-working glass should have a look at the MOM web site and plans. There are lots of good ideas there. The

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Making a Mirror grinding & Polishing machine ATM, Optics

Mar 16, 2015· Page 1 of 5 Making a Mirror grinding & Polishing machine posted in ATM, Optics and DIY Forum: Hello, I am on the half of the way to make a mirror grinding machine inspired by original M-O-M design. I made the pulley arrangement such a way that, both the turn table & eccentric spins at 50 RPM fixed. I wont go for making mirror bigger that 10.5 (or max 12).

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Mirror Grinding Machine Hackaday

Sep 26, 2006· Grinding and polishing your own mirrors is a long, arduous process. Instead of lapping the blank by hand, Laurie Hall built this mirror grinding machine from scratch.

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Astro-Tel Mirror grinding machine

MIRROR GRINDING MACHINE. I made my first mirror grinding and polishing machine over thirty years ago. It used the working principle of the machine illustrated at "A" Fig.3, Page 163, "Amateur Telescope Making" Book 1. A bowl which rotated was fitted to the spindle. I also built another machine

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Mirror grinding scope making

A good starter size is the 150 mm (6") mirror. A 200mm (8") will also work. Most ATM books and websites recommend a Pyrex® mirror blank, but in my opinion, annealed plate glass is better for this first, "learn and practice" mirror.It is cheaper, it is softer and grinds faster, needing less abrasives and with these small sizes, the low expansion glass like Pyrex has no practical (visible at

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jeffbaldwin.org

Fixed-post machine grinding is where the mirror is on a turntable rotating around 20 PRM [speeds vary], and a 75% tool is on top. They are already curve-generated. The tool is hanging over the mirror by 1/6 the diameter of the tool, or about 1/8 diameter of the mirror, and is fixed in this position.

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Build your own telescope part 1: The mirror Thomas

Rough grinding. This step is about making one side of the glass concave. It will give your mirror its overall focal ratio. If you make the centre deep, you will end up with a fast telescope (e.g. F/D = 4) well suited for deep sky observations. On the opposite, a shallow mirror (e.g. F/D = 8) will be performing very well on planets and the moon.

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Homemade Sphere Machine Machining projects, Homemade

Jun 15, 2016 Homemade sphere machine constructed from angle iron, steel plate, electric motors, hinges, and reducers.

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How I Make Light-Weight Hexagon or Honeycomb Telescope

I plan on grinding and polishing this 12.5 inch mirror to see how well it takes a figure, and if the pattern of the back prints through. I am also planning on making larger diameter versions of this design. I will post updates in the future. Update 02/15/12 I have started the process of rough grinding the 12.5 inch honeycomb-back mirror blank.

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Astro-Tel Mirror grinding machine

MIRROR GRINDING MACHINE. I made my first mirror grinding and polishing machine over thirty years ago. It used the working principle of the machine illustrated at "A" Fig.3, Page 163, "Amateur Telescope Making" Book 1. A bowl which rotated was fitted to the spindle. I also built another machine

More

Mirror Grinding Machine Hackaday

Sep 26, 2006· Grinding and polishing your own mirrors is a long, arduous process. Instead of lapping the blank by hand, Laurie Hall built this mirror grinding machine from scratch.

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DIY l Homemade Mirror grinding machine YouTube

Feb 03, 2013· This video was uploaded from an Android phone.

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DIY Telescope Mirror grinding machine YouTube

Jul 08, 2013· Homemade 10inch Mirror Grinding Machine. Sorry for blurred image.....

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Adjustable Tool Grinder Home Metal Shop Club

(including one as mirror image i.e. circlips face each other) NOTE: Bearing length includes extra space for felt washers to keep grit out of bearing. Tool Grinder Drawings SHEET 8 OF 21 REV. A A SIZE FILE NAME SCALE 2:1 Bearing Block PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF MARTIN KENNEDY.

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Large Thin Mirror Making BBAstroDesigns

In addition, a great deal of money will be saved: a finished 24" scope will set you back $7,000; grinding your own mirror and building the mount yourself will cost you $2,000. Amateurs have made mirrors up to 41" by hand. A grinding machine relieves the labor, but is not necessary. A 24" is the largest you can comfortably do solo.

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Homemade Sphere Machine Machining projects, Homemade

Jun 15, 2016 Homemade sphere machine constructed from angle iron, steel plate, electric motors, hinges, and reducers.

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Is there an easy and safe way to trim/grind the edge of a

I'm trying to fit a pre-cut mirror glass (rescued from a $5 Wal-Mart mirror) into the back of a shadow box. The mirror itself is not quite square, so there is one corner and part of the adjacent edge which won't quite fit into box (about 0.5 mm overlap). If this was wood or plastic, I'd grab some sandpaper and bring the edge down to fit.

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Stellafane ATM:Mirror Making Myths

With the Mirror on top, the tool on the bottom, and coarse grit in between, we start grinding with the mirror overhanging the tool. We rub the center of mirror against the edge of the tool, and this wears a depression in the center of the mirror (the edge of the tool wears down also, so that the tool becomes convex (a "hill" in the center) and

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Telescope Making Supplies

Throughout the grinding and final lapping stages, the objective has been to reduce pits and scratches to the smallest possible size. However, no amount of grinding can produce a surface smooth enough or sufficiently transparent to meet the needs of a first-class telescope objective. Different techniques are

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